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Zoom "As I give, I get."
- Mary McLeod Bethune.                                      119 years and counting. 💜 #NACWC #LiftingAsWeClimb

"As I give, I get."
- Mary McLeod Bethune. 119 years and counting. 💜 #NACWC #LiftingAsWeClimb

07.21.14 0
Zoom Happy #InternationalWomensDay! 💜

Happy #InternationalWomensDay! 💜

03.08.14 0
Zoom Happy #InternationalWomensDay! 💜

Happy #InternationalWomensDay! 💜

03.08.14 0
Zoom lookatthewords:

gradientlair:

Black women on U.S.postage stamps. 

This makes me wanna send some letters.

lookatthewords:

gradientlair:

Black women on U.S.postage stamps

This makes me wanna send some letters.

02.06.14 863
Zoom coolchicksfromhistory:

Mary Ann Shadd (1823-1893)
Art by Brynne Oster-Bainnson (tumblr)
Mary Ann was the oldest of 13 children born to free parents in Wilmington, Delaware.  For 12 years, she taught black children in Delaware, New York, and Pennsylvania.  In 1850, the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act threatened the rights of free blacks, so Mary Ann and her brother moved to Canada.  They settled in Windsor, Ontario and founded a racially integrated school.  From 1853 to 1857, Mary Ann published The Provincial Freeman weekly, making her the first black woman in North America to publish a newspaper.  Mary Ann eventually moved to Toronto and married a widower named Thomas Cary. 
After her husband’s death, Mary Ann and her children returned to the United States.  During the Civil War, she worked as a recruiting officer for the Union Army in Indiana enlisting black volunteers.  After the war, she returned to teaching and worked at black schools in Wilmington and Washington, DC.  While living in DC, Mary Ann attended Howard University School of Law, graduating at the age of 60.  She was second black woman in the United States to earn a law degree. 
Mary Ann’s former home in the U Street Corridor of Washington, DC is a National Historic Landmark, although it is not open to visitors.  

coolchicksfromhistory:

Mary Ann Shadd (1823-1893)

Art by Brynne Oster-Bainnson (tumblr)

Mary Ann was the oldest of 13 children born to free parents in Wilmington, Delaware.  For 12 years, she taught black children in Delaware, New York, and Pennsylvania.  In 1850, the passage of the Fugitive Slave Act threatened the rights of free blacks, so Mary Ann and her brother moved to Canada.  They settled in Windsor, Ontario and founded a racially integrated school.  From 1853 to 1857, Mary Ann published The Provincial Freeman weekly, making her the first black woman in North America to publish a newspaper.  Mary Ann eventually moved to Toronto and married a widower named Thomas Cary. 

After her husband’s death, Mary Ann and her children returned to the United States.  During the Civil War, she worked as a recruiting officer for the Union Army in Indiana enlisting black volunteers.  After the war, she returned to teaching and worked at black schools in Wilmington and Washington, DC.  While living in DC, Mary Ann attended Howard University School of Law, graduating at the age of 60.  She was second black woman in the United States to earn a law degree

Mary Ann’s former home in the U Street Corridor of Washington, DC is a National Historic Landmark, although it is not open to visitors.  

02.06.14 369
Zoom coolchicksfromhistory:

Martha Bryant and Eulalie Hampden operating a bolt cutting machine.
Circa 1943

coolchicksfromhistory:

Martha Bryant and Eulalie Hampden operating a bolt cutting machine.

Circa 1943

02.05.14 404
Zoom uspsstamps:

Happy birthday, Richard Wright! Best remembered for his controversial 1940 novel, Native Son, and his 1945 autobiography, Black Boy, Wright drew on a wide range of literary traditions, including protest writing and detective fiction, to craft unflinching portrayals of racism in American society.

uspsstamps:

Happy birthday, Richard Wright! Best remembered for his controversial 1940 novel, Native Son, and his 1945 autobiography, Black Boy, Wright drew on a wide range of literary traditions, including protest writing and detective fiction, to craft unflinching portrayals of racism in American society.

02.05.14 9
Zoom uspsstamps:

Today we wish a happy birthday to novelist, folklorist, and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960). 
A central figure in the Harlem Renaissance, Hurston wrote four novels, two books of folklore, an autobiography, and more than 50 short stories and essays. Their Eyes Were Watching God, considered Hurston’s masterpiece, was published in 1937. This novel broke new ground in its portrayal of a black woman’s search for identity, love, and freedom.
Although her writing went out of fashion in the 1950s, it enjoyed a dramatic revival in the 1970s. Today Hurston is considered one of America’s most original and accomplished writers.

uspsstamps:

Today we wish a happy birthday to novelist, folklorist, and anthropologist Zora Neale Hurston (18911960). 

A central figure in the Harlem Renaissance, Hurston wrote four novels, two books of folklore, an autobiography, and more than 50 short stories and essays. Their Eyes Were Watching God, considered Hurston’s masterpiece, was published in 1937. This novel broke new ground in its portrayal of a black woman’s search for identity, love, and freedom.

Although her writing went out of fashion in the 1950s, it enjoyed a dramatic revival in the 1970s. Today Hurston is considered one of America’s most original and accomplished writers.

02.05.14 21
Zoom uspsstamps:

Today we celebrate the birthday of one of the most important American writers of the 20th century: Langston Hughes, who played a leading role in the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s and early 1930s. Although he considered himself a poet first, Hughes wrote in many literary genres, from short stories to drama. His innovative poetry combined jazz, blues, and the black vernacular with the traditions of poetry in English. Admired in his own time, Hughes is now considered one of the most important American writers of the 20th century.

uspsstamps:

Today we celebrate the birthday of one of the most important American writers of the 20th century: Langston Hughes, who played a leading role in the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s and early 1930s. Although he considered himself a poet first, Hughes wrote in many literary genres, from short stories to drama. His innovative poetry combined jazz, blues, and the black vernacular with the traditions of poetry in English. Admired in his own time, Hughes is now considered one of the most important American writers of the 20th century.

02.05.14 48
Zoom uspsstamps:

We are very pleased to announce that the Literary Arts series will return on February 18, 2014, with the release of a stamp honoring author Ralph Ellison. Ellison is best known for his 1952 novel “Invisible Man,” but have you also read his fantastic 1964 essay collection “Shadow and Act”? Learn more about Ralph Ellison, his work, and his influences at uspsstamps.com.

uspsstamps:

We are very pleased to announce that the Literary Arts series will return on February 18, 2014, with the release of a stamp honoring author Ralph Ellison. Ellison is best known for his 1952 novel “Invisible Man,” but have you also read his fantastic 1964 essay collection “Shadow and Act”? Learn more about Ralph Ellison, his work, and his influences at uspsstamps.com.

02.05.14 27